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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
go to www.wkdtrbo57.bigstep.com . there i have a link to a hp and 1/4 mile calculator. simply type in your car's weight off u go!!! i am trying to promote my site-please help. there are also 30 or so nissan related links.. thanks
 

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That HP one is WAY off. It told me I have 158.19 HP at wheels, 205.65 HP at flywheel
I dont think so.

MarC
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well MarC, this is not my calculation-just a link. just out of curiousity-how "off" is the HP one? can u shed some light on it? and also - is the 1/4 mile one off? thanks for looking anyway MarC.. :)
 

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A quarter-mile calculator should really calculate trap speed, not ET (trap speeds are far more consistent).

The following formula is used for many such calculators:


HP = Weight (lbs) x (Trap Speed (mph) / 234) ^ 3
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">1hp = 550lb 1ft 1second...
i guess thats assuming 1:1 gear ratio and 15% driveline loss...</font>
Actually, horsepower is derived directly from torque. That's why on a dyno chart the HP and Torque curves cross at the exact same point every time. I can dig up a HP vs Torque article if you want, it's sort of a tricky subject and even though I've read a lot about it I don't feel like I know enough to explain it.



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Paul
'92 NX2000 w/ mods
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Scarpa:
Actually, horsepower is derived directly from torque. That's why on a dyno chart the HP and Torque curves cross at the exact same point every time. I can dig up a HP vs Torque article if you want, it's sort of a tricky subject and even though I've read a lot about it I don't feel like I know enough to explain it.

</font>
you got me all wrong, i just gave out the definition for the unit horsepower. i mentioned that those trap-speed calculators probably assumes that there is a 15% parasitic loss (through drivetrain) and that all the crank is hooked up to wheels at axles at 1:1 ratio.

hp is a calculated number from torque and engine speed. hp = torque*rpm/5252
 
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