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Discussion Starter #1
This is done by adjusting the length of both of the parallel (radius) arms, correct? Ingalls actually sells an arm:




I'm guessing that you use the toe adjustment to adjust the length of the other stock arm?

The other option is to make your own, like Greg Amy did:



I'm guessing with both arms you would get more adjustability and stronger arms? Greg also used heim joints there, while the ingalls uses either rubber or polyurethan. How would the NVH be using the Heim joints? Also, I have read that the trailing arm is really not needed to locate the knuckle. Its there just to add strength. So, with stronger tubular arms, would it be possible to completely ditch the trailing arm since it binds?

Another advantage to this that steve f pointed out to me is that you could take away negative camber by relocating the holes on the strut ears to give you more strut to wheel clearance, then get the negative camber back by adjusting the parallel arms.

I was also wondering how changing the length of the parallel arms changes other aspects of the suspension geometry, like roll center, scrub, etc.
 

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technics professional
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i just my first pair, two on backorder.

you got it right, the adjustment of the arms allows fine tuning of alignment.

two is better than one, despite what their site says... the instructions in the box say not to use on race cars?!?
 

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Just to clarify: those arms are on Norm Nelsons' Classifc, currently built to Production specs. The car was an ex-World Challenge car, built by the Archer Bros team, IIRC. Such arms are not legal in Improved Touring.

If you did not install two arms, any adjustment would result in toe changes. Also, this suspension is not adequately located without the forward link; any fore/aft forces would simply collapse the rectangle...
 

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mpg9999 said:
I'm guessing with both arms you would get more adjustability and stronger arms? Greg also used heim joints there, while the ingalls uses either rubber or polyurethan. How would the NVH be using the Heim joints? Also, I have read that the trailing arm is really not needed to locate the knuckle. Its there just to add strength. So, with stronger tubular arms, would it be possible to completely ditch the trailing arm since it binds?
I can't imagine the b13 suspension working with out the trailing arms. It would move forward or back at any time. The binding you are referring to would be eliminated to a great degree by that double heim joint arm setup. The arc of those two arms is up and down. The trailing arm moves in a arc. This pulls the arms forward and back as it moves. The ES bushings in particular resist this forward and back movement. Those Heim joints would allow it to move freely forward and back so binding would be eliminated.

On my S13 Heim joints have not hurt the ride. They actually helped the ride greatly when paired with ES bushings as they elimated the binding in my multilink rear suspension as well.

To get some extra clearance in the rear at the hub and then getting the camber back at the arms would not change the track too much. It just depends on how much you try to adjust the top.




That arm should be legal in a lot of classes as it does not use metalic bushings.
 

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Camber adjustment 'ey? Quite a concept.
 
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