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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are come pretty good scratches all over the side of my passenger door. One is even on the corner that meets with the door. I am wondering how much luck people have had with using touch up paint. I have found some methods using a toothpick and all that. But what about slightly larger ones? Has anyone used the stuff that comes with clearcoat?

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Kevin
93 Classic
w/ advanced timing & Stillen POP
 

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Turd Furgeson
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Ok, so I have a lot of scratches all over. I honestly think the factory paint sucks. (on my car at least) Touch up paint was ok at first, but now it changed color, and looks lousy. Of course only I, and people like me notice this stuff. There are some swirl/scratch removers, and they work ok (meguiar's,mothers or whatever) As long as I can contain the rust issue my $$ is going towards a new paint job. What's the toothpick method? Do you use it to fill in the groove created by the scratch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah....My main concern is rust. I really don't want that, but can't afford a paint job for another year. So, I'm looking for a temp fix. Here is the method I found in the se-r.net archives:

"Otherwise, I have a procedure to "remove" scratches which leaves them (almost) invisible (adapted from the Mercedes Mailing List):

1) Get some touch-up paint from Nissan.

2) Paint the scratch with a LIGHT application and let it dry. (The Mercedes list instructions said to use a toothpick to apply the paint in order to keep it within the confines of the scratch. I have used the brush applicator with success, though.)

3) Repeat 2 until the paint is slightly higher than the surrounding surface.

4) Cut a small block of wood from a piece of 1/2 inch thick board (1 X 1 X 1/2).

5) Cut a small piece of old T-shirt (or similar cloth) large enough to completely surround the block. Stretch it tight and tack it to the block.

6) Get some liquid rubbing compound (I am currently using Turtle Wax Rubbing Compound Liquid Formula).

7) Be sure the paint is COMPLETELY DRY (overnight). Wet the cloth-covered block and apply some rubbing compound to the smallest surface.

8) Rub the block over the painted spot. The rigid block removes the raised paint much more quickly than the surrounding paint. Check the progress often and apply more rubbing compound as needed.

9) When the filled-in spot is level with the surrounding area, hose off and wipe with a wet cloth to remove the rubbing compound residue.

10) Repeat 7-9, if necessary.

11) The area is now dull-looking. Get some polishing compound (I use Blue Coral Liquid White Polishing Compound). Apply to a damp cloth and go over the area.

12) Remove the polishing compound with a wet cloth/hose and dry it.

13) It is now ready for wax to complete the job."

Now, I believe this is for the Dupli-Coat type stuff. There is also stuff that you get that you use clear coat. I'm really interested in how both fair.




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Kevin
93 Classic
w/ advanced timing & Stillen POP
 
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