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Does anyone know what spring rate ground control springs are going to come with if I don't specify a spring rate and order them from another company? 300/200?
 

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employment whiplash, NC
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I ordered from Rosen Autosport. They had several different rates availible. I settled on 350/250. Of course, they didn't have all the different rate that GC would have, but 350/250 was pretty much what I was looking for.
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Doug H:
Does anyone know what spring rate ground control springs are going to come with if I don't specify a spring rate and order them from another company? 300/200? </font>
If the salesperson for the company is smart, they'll ask you what spring rates you'd want. If they don't ask, then you should ask them what rates they would have. If they say they don't know, then ask them to get one of the spring kits, have the look at the ERS springs themselves, and tell them to read you the numbers. It should say something like this: 700.250.300. The first number stands for the length of the spring (7"), the second number should stand for the diameter of the spring (2.5") and the third number is the spring rate (300lbs.) Now, some ERS springs will have the numbers in metric like this: 150.64.53. The first two numbers are in millimeters, and I'm not sure what measurement the 3rd number is in. Those were numbers on a pair of my ERS springs, and they are 6", 300lb springs. 350f/250r rates aren't a bad choice of rates at all, and neither is 300/200. So, if you're looking for more aggressive handling while maintaining a soft enough ride, I wouldn't go past 350/250, but I also wouldn't lower the car more than 1" (even after trimming bumpstops.) Hope that helps.

--Andrew Phan
1993 NX2000
1998 200SX SE-R
 

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rally wanksta
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The last number is Newtons/mm as opposed to lbs./in. There are 4.4 N in 1 lb. and 25.4 mm in 1 in., so 300 lb/in ~= 52 N/mm.
 
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