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Drive it like ya stole it
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am mystified about this...anyone have any ideas? Anything would help...thanks..
Ground Control 1991-1994 Nissan Sentra/NX
0" to 2.5" drop; works w/KYB AGX and GAB HP shocks
Eibach PRO-KIT 91-94 Nissan NX; Front = 1.4 in Rear = 1.1 in

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Got 5-th gear pop-out problem?(FROM TalkingEAR) http://www.petitiononline.com/44ndone/
Damn it...I want an SE-R...NOW I HAVE ONE!! Bone Stock though...: (
 

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Premium Member
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11,741 Posts
lowering springs lower your car to a certain amount, example: eibach prokits are a 1.25" drop, with the coilovers you can adjust how much you want to drop the car, basically they are adjustable springs. check out ground control's page for more ingo: http://www.ground-control.com/

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Serban Gavrilescu
91 Black Metallic SE-R
146.5hp & 131.6lb-ft torque

Serban's SE-R Page
 

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employment whiplash, NC
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3,646 Posts
I'm sure you're familiar with what lowering springs look like. Coilovers are way different. You slide a threaded collar over the shock. A new spring perch threads onto this collar. The new spring sits on this adjustable spring perch.

Advantages to coilovers:
-Lower the car as much or as little as you want.
-You can corner weight your car for better balance.
-The springs are linear rate instead of the progressive rate of most lowering springs.
-You can get whatever spring rate you want.

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Matt
92 SE-R from Heck

"What have you DONE to that thing..." - stranger at Rockingham dragway 5/18/01
"Where's the turbo?" - stranger at the 1st autocross of 2000 where my SE-R debuted
"That thing is a goddamn rocket ship. I'm not lifting for you on the straights anymore!" -Karl Shultz, Rockingham 4/27/01
"What in the hell have you done since I drove it last?" -David Stone, Rockingham 4/27/01
 

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Drive it like ya stole it
Joined
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6,928 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by MaddMatt:
I'm sure you're familiar with what lowering springs look like. Coilovers are way different. You slide a threaded collar over the shock. A new spring perch threads onto this collar. The new spring sits on this adjustable spring perch.

Advantages to coilovers:
-Lower the car as much or as little as you want.
-You can corner weight your car for better balance.
-The springs are linear rate instead of the progressive rate of most lowering springs.
-You can get whatever spring rate you want.

</font>
I'm not fermiliar with "linear rate" and "progressive rate" if you think you can explain it to me....and spring rate...that would help...I think I'm just going to go with the GroundCongtrol and AGX's...what do you guys think?

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Got 5-th gear pop-out problem?(FROM TalkingEAR) http://www.petitiononline.com/44ndone/
Damn it...I want an SE-R...NOW I HAVE ONE!! Bone Stock though...: (
 

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employment whiplash, NC
Joined
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3,646 Posts
Spring rate is the amount of force it takes to compress the spring 1 inch. a 200 lb rate spring means it takes 200 lbs to compress the spring 1 inch.

Progressive rate. These are what typical lowering springs are. If you look at them, you'll notice the spring is not a perfect cylider, but perhaps a bit conical in shape. The bottom of the spring is usually the "soft" part, with the top of the spring the "hard" part. As the suspension compresses, the soft part of the spring compresses first, the as cornering loads increase, it "progresses" into the higher rate section of the spring. A typical lowering spring might start off at 110 lbs/in, but finish at 180 lbs/in. So, in the first, say, inch of travel, it only takes 110 lbs to compress this spring 1 inch. Over the 2nd inch of travel, it takes another 180 lbs to compress this spring another inch.

Linear rate. There are no funky shapes or anything to produce different rates as the spring compresses. If you get a GC 300 lbs/in spring, it takes 300 lbs to compress it the first inch. It takes another 300lbs to compress it a second inch. And so on....

So, IMO, linear rate springs are superior for performance driving because the spring is not changing rates as the suspension compresses. But, progressive rate springs are typically better for street driving because when you hit a bump, you're using the "soft" part of the spring whereas on a 300 lbs/in linear spring, you just jarred 2 fillings loose.

Anyone is welcome to comment and correct...

edits are because I cn't spel
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Matt
92 SE-R from Heck

"What have you DONE to that thing..." - stranger at Rockingham dragway 5/18/01
"Where's the turbo?" - stranger at the 1st autocross of 2000 where my SE-R debuted
"That thing is a goddamn rocket ship. I'm not lifting for you on the straights anymore!" -Karl Shultz, Rockingham 4/27/01
"What in the hell have you done since I drove it last?" -David Stone, Rockingham 4/27/01

[This message has been edited by MaddMatt (edited 10-08-2001).]

[This message has been edited by MaddMatt (edited 10-08-2001).]
 

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Sounds good to me! If you want performance...go with coilovers... if you want a look for cheap then get springs...they usually do increase handling ability, but now always...
 
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